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Favourite film anti-heroes

Writer: Dzamira Dzafri


The eagerly awaited third installment of "Riddick" comes to cinemas this 5 September!

While we all love a good hero to save the day, most of us have a desire to get to know the dark side, even just for a little while. Some of us can even say proudly that our favourite kinds of characters are the anti-heroes.

Anti-heroes are often characters that take up a good amount of space in a film and while the classic movie involves the lead character to do good and save the day, anti-heroes are a response to the repetitious storyline. More and more people want to hear the story based on the other side.

Riddick is just one of the prime examples of what an anti-hero should be, and along with a few other anti-heroes we loved in films, we show you why.

Richard B. Riddick, "Riddick" (2013)

Riddick, or if you go buy his full name Richard B. Riddick, is the ultimate anti-hero. Being a highly skilled predator, he is fast, strong, deadly and hard to contain. Despite being violent in nature, he does sometimes perform moral or even heroic actions. The character can be seen in "Pitch Black" and "The Chronicles of Riddick" before the eagerly awaited continuation, "Riddick".

Very few characters are at once so deadly efficient and as charismatic as Riddick. He does what needs to be done. He does not kill lightly and when he does kill he does it swiftly with deadly precision and economy of movement. He might be in the dark side but he still puts the hero in anti-hero.

Alex DeLarge, "A Clockwork Orange" (1971)

Alexander DeLarge is a charismatic, sociopathic delinquent whose interests include classical music, rape, and what is termed "ultra-violence". In the film, he goes through a horrific crime spree of his gang, his capture, and attempted rehabilitation via controversial psychological conditioning.

He might not be as heroic as other anti-heroes but the classic icon does show his status and power by doing wrong deeds and stepping on his pals. He does, at the near end, try to show remorse for what he's done and tries to change but, like how all anti-heroes go if they go a bit too far, the result doesn't particularly end well.

Beatrix Kiddo, "Kill Bill" (2003)

Also known as "The Bride" or "Black Mamba", the protagonist of the iconic Quentin Tarantino film was a former member of an elite, shadowy group of assassins. She is a ruthless warrior trained under a martial arts master, and after her old squad tries to assassinate her and kills everyone she loves, she vows to kill Bill, her old boss and everyone who was involved with her past.

Though she did kill a great amount of people, she did have some sort of justification behind it. Being a ruthless assassin herself, she might not have passed as a hero if it was a regular film, but audiences rooted for her nonetheless.

Tyler Durden, "Fight Club" (1999)

Created by author Chuck Palahniuk, the character of Tyler Durden is basically an alter ego of the unnamed protagonist, an 'everyman' who is discontented with his white-collar job. He forms a 'fight club' that are joined by men who also want to fight recreationally.

This cult-favourite anti-hero is likeable when audiences watch the film because, although he's created himself an illegal fight club and eventually created a cult club for himself, everyday working males go crazy for their fantasy to come alive on film. Many dream of standing up to their jobs and their everyday life and this film personifies the dark dream for them.

Sherlock Homes, "Sherlock Holmes" (2009)"

Sherlock Holmes is a London-based 'consulting detective' created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and is famous for his astute logical reasoning, his ability to adopt almost any disguise, and his use of forensic science skills to solve difficult cases.

He is considered more of an anti-hero than a regular hero, even if he does do good deeds in the long run because of his unethical ways to do a job, his unlikable personality and lacks a sense of moral responsibility or social conscience.

Frank Martin, "Transporter" (2002)

The protagonist of the popular franchise serves as a reluctant hero. His has a military background and retires from this after becoming fatigued with his superior officers. In simple terms, he just got tired of seeing his best efforts turned to nothing by the same people paying him to do the job. So he puts his skills to action as a private driver for hire.

Frank Martin isn't just a regular driver, as he provides his service for gangsters and wealthy families, and when these people involved, Martin will need to get himself out of trouble when it finds him. He does 'save the day' but he is still doing jobs that aren't exactly legal which makes him a good addition to this list.

Lisbeth Salander, "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo" (2011)

Created by Swedish author and journalist Stieg Larsson, Lisbeth Salander is described as "a pale, skinny young woman who had hair as short as a fuse, and a pierced nose and eyebrows. On those occasions when she had been wearing a tank top, a dragon tattoo can be seen on her left shoulder blade."

Salander is a world class computer hacker and a survivor of a traumatic childhood. She is particularly hostile to men who abuse women, and takes special pleasure in exposing and punishing them. White she can be called a hero of sorts, she does her good deeds unconventionally, just like most of the others in this list and often at times she does them violently.


Cinema Online, 04 September 2013

Related Movies:
Riddick (35mm) (05 Sep 2013)

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